The GLAD Rappers

I recently had the privilege to visit The GLAD Rappers: Redecorate – a museum bedroom, installation at Federation Square. A colourful and artistic collaboration expressed via the medium of wool and knitting. I loved it and I would advise that you go and visit it as well. The exhibition ends on the 3rd of April 2017.

When The Johnstone Collection invited yarn bombers to their ‘Return To The City’ 2016 Christmas tour, Melbourne’s GLAD Rappers imagined redecorating the museum’s ‘Yellow Room’ before Mr. Johnston, his partner and their cat returned to their city home for Christmas.

The Johnston Collection was gifted by William Johnston (1911-1986) to the people of Victoria. A multiaward winning and critically acclaimed independent not-for-profit museum, it has a reputation for sharing stories, inspiring communities and pushing boundaries in museum exhibition.

It will be a shame to see this installation shelved so if you are interested in showing it off, you can find The GLAD Rappers on Facebook and thegladrappers on Instagram or email them at gladrappers@gmail.com. Click on the link to visit and view the Johnston Collection.

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EVENT | VIENNA THERAPY

The public art installation “Vienna Therapy” in Melbourne’s St. Paul’s Court at Federation Square was open to the public March 8-12, 2017. Internationally recognized Viennese artist Nychos presented his sculpture entitled “The Dissection of Sigmund Freud”, a ten foot tall white sculpture of the father of psychoanalysis. Revealing the innermost essence. Both Freud and street artist Nychos combine psychoanalysis with art to bring the hidden to light.

Just as Freud drew inspiration from Vienna, Nychos looks to historic Viennese places with a dark past – such as the Madhouse Tower in the old Vienna General Hospital where Freud once taught. Whether walking along the Ringstrasse or relaxing at his favourite coffee house at Café Landtmann, both men are rooted to this special city and share the desire to reveal inner secrets.

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EVENT | Moomba 2017

The City of Melbourne proudly presents Australia’s largest free community festival Moomba. The uniquely Melbourne program of activities and events runs from 10 to 13 March on the banks of the iconic Yarra River at Birrarung Marr and Alexandra Gardens.

Highlights of the family-friendly program include the Moomba Parade with its artistic, community-inspired floats and the wacky Birdman Rally. Moomba Festival showcases the talents of local performers and the hospitality of our traders. The Moomba Masters’ world-class watersports, and the pro scoot, skate and BMX competitions are also favourites in our sports-mad city.

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The Language of Ornament

The Language of Ornament explores the history of ornament in the Western design tradition. It examines a series of motifs, charting their appearance and reappearance in design from antiquity through to the twenty-first century. A wide range of artworks illustrate how motifs have been translated from one medium to another and have been borrowed and reinterpreted over the centuries.

Works in the exhibition range from eighteenth-century Wedgwood ceramics copying motifs from ancient Greek vases to a postmodern tea service by Michael Graves drawing on Classical architectural forms. The putto figure, a chubby male child dating from Classical antiquity, was a popular motif from the Renaissance period onwards. Essentially a secular, ornamental motif, it occurs continually through the early modern period right down to the twentieth century, referenced through a broad range of media including prints, sculpture and ceramics. The exhibition encompasses a rich selection of works from the NGV Collection including ceramics, glass, metalwork, furniture, textiles, prints and contemporary design and pop culture.

FREE ENTRY
NGV INTERNATIONAL
LEVEL 2, DECORATIVE ARTS PASSAGE
24 FEB – DEC
OPEN 10AM–5PM DAILY

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Event | NGV TRIENNIAL

More than 60 artists from over 30 countries, including Ron Mueck, Yayoi Kusama, Guo Pei, Richard Mosse, Ben Quilty, Neri Oxman, PET Lamp and Bula’bula Artists were announced yesterday as part of the inaugural NGV Triennial, an unprecedented global showcase of art, design and architecture set to open at NGV International on 15 December 2017 – 15 April 2018.

The FREE, Melbourne-exclusive exhibition will traverse all four levels of NGV International and display art and design together, from 3D printing and robotics, to performance, film, painting, drawing, fashion design, tapestry and sculpture. The exhibition will also present work from regions not strongly represented in the NGV’s current holdings including Africa, South America and the Middle East.

Argentinian artist Alexandra Kehayoglou travelled to Melbourne for today’s announcement, appearing with her major 8m-long work No Longer Creek. Using her family’s traditional carpet-making techniques, Kehayoglou documents the effects of human activity upon landscapes in Argentina in her intricate and large-scale works.

Bruce Armstrong Sculptures at NGV Australia

Bruce Armstrong Sculptures at NGV Australia

Twenty major new works have been commissioned by the NGV for the NGV Triennial including:
Alexandra Kehayoglou (Argentina) – using her family’s traditional carpet-making techniques, a monumental 100m2 carpet landscape titled Santa Cruz River that documents one of Argentina’s most contested landscapes

Bruce Armstrong Sculptures at NGV Australia

Bruce Armstrong Sculptures at NGV Australia

Candice Breitz (South Africa) – a new video work that reveals the personal histories of six refugees, which sees Hollywood actors Julianne Moore and Alec Baldwin give voice to their stories to bring the privilege of celebrity into contrast with the hardship of the refugee experience

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Candice Breitz Stills from Love Story, 2016 Featuring Julianne Moore and Alec Baldwin Interviewee: Sarah Ezzat Mardini 7-Channel Installation: 7 Hard Drives Commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria (Melbourne), Outset Germany (Berlin) and the Medienboard Berlin-Brandenburg

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Candice Breitz Stills from Love Story, 2016 Featuring Alec Baldwin and Julianne Moore Interviewee: José Maria João 7-Channel Installation: 7 Hard Drives Commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria (Melbourne), Outset Germany (Berlin) and the Medienboard Berlin-Brandenburg.

Estudio Campana (Brazil), Yarrenyty Arltere Artists (Australia) and Elliat Rich (France) – an important collaboration that draws upon the shared cultural motifs of the artists to create a brightly coloured upholstered dome, to be used as a meeting point and welcoming entrance to the exhibition

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Estudio Campana / Yarrenyty Arltere Artists / Elliat Rich Vitória Régia 2017 (concept) Commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Courtesy Estudio Campana

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Estudio Campana / Yarrenyty Arltere Artists / Elliat Rich Vitória Régia 2017 (concept) Commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Courtesy Estudio Campana

Formafantasma (Italy) – a new body of research by the Italian designers that investigates the impact of the global trade in rare earth materials for consumer goods such as smartphones

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Formafantasma Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani

Guo Pei (China) – an installation of elaborate, Marie Antoinette-inspired gowns from Pei’s latest haute couture collection Legend, following the designer’s work being catapulted onto the international stage when Rihanna wore her canary-yellow ball gown and cape to the 2015 Met Ball

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Guo Pei Rose Studio Autumn/Winter 2011 Haute Couture Courtesy Guo Pei, Rose Studio, Beijing

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Guo Pei Rose Studio Autumn/Winter 2011 Haute Couture Courtesy Guo Pei, Rose Studio, Beijing

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Guo Pei Rose Studio Autumn/Winter 2011 Haute Couture Courtesy Guo Pei, Rose Studio, Beijing

PET Lamp (Spain) and Bula’bula Artists (Australia) – a cross-cultural collaboration between Spanish-based designers PET Lamp and Indigenous women weavers from the Northern Territory to produce the first Australian version of a PET Lamp, a project that emerged in response to the global issue of plastic waste

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PET Lamp / Bula’bula Artists ARTS013856 PET Lamp / Bula’bula Artists EXHI044864 PET Lamp / Bula’bula Artists EXHI044865 Sissel Tolaas Sissel Tolaas Fear 2014 Courtesy the artist and Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark EXHI045365 Formafantasma PET Lamp Ramingining 2017 (process) Commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne © Alvaro Catalán de Ocón Photo: Tobias Titz

Richard Mosse (Ireland) – a three-channel video that uses a high-tech long-range military camera to capture events surrounding the crisis in Syria and subsequent flood of refugees, jointly commissioned by the NGV and London’s Barbican Art Gallery

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Richard Mosse Still frame from Incoming 2014-2017 Three-screen HD video installation with 7.1 surround sound 52 mins 10 secs Made in collaboration with Trevor Tweeten & Ben Frost & co-commissioned by National Gallery Victoria & Barbican Art Gallery

Ron Mueck (Australia) – an epic sculptural display from the Melbourne-born, UK-based artist that will intervene with works in the NGV’s 18th century gallery spaces, in Mueck’s largest and most extraordinary work to date

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A sculpture entitled “Mask II” by sculptor Ron Mueck, at the San Ildefonso Museum in Mexico City, on September 20, 2011

Sissel Tolaas (Norway) – the renowned ‘smell designer’, with a personal library of 7,000 smells and 2,500 molecules, will create a ‘scent of Melbourne’ for the NGV Triennial

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Sissel Tolaas Fear 2014 Courtesy the artist and Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark

teamLab (Japan) – an interactive and immersive installation from the famous ‘ultratechnologist’ design collective that digitally recreates a ‘vortex’ that responds as water would to the audience’s presence and movement

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Walk Through the Crystal Universe by teamLab

Xu Zhen (China) – a dramatic and immense sculptural installation that features replicas of famous classical sculptures adorning a 15.8m long sculpture of Buddha, considering the role of tradition and ritual in our increasingly global world

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Xu Zhen. European Thousand-Arms Classical Sculpture, 2014, glass fiber reinforced concrete, marble grains, marble, metal, 304 x 1470 x 473 cm, Produced by MadeIn Company, at Long Museum, Shanghai, China, 2015 Photo: Thomas Fuesser

Yayoi Kusama (Japan) – one of the most respected senior artists working today, Kusama will present a major new participatory project in which visitors will ‘obliterate’ a specially made domestic setting with flower motifs, referencing her first experience of hallucination

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Yayoi Kusama Copyright of Yayoi Kusama and Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/ Singapore

NGV Triennial – Artists and designers:
Adel Abidin, Iraq

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Adel Abidin Cover up! 2014 black and white, one channel video, sound, ed. 1/5 plus artist’s proof, no. 1/5 2 min 25 sec (looped) © Adel Abidin courtesy of Lawrie Shabibi Gallery, Dubai

Alexandra Kehayoglou, Argentina
Analia Saban, Argentina
Ben Quilty, Australia
Brodie Neill, Australia
Büro North, Australia
Camille Henrot, France
Candice Breitz, South Africa
David Altmejd, Canada
Edson Chagas, Angola

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Edson Chagas Emmanuel C. Bofala, Tipo Passe series 2014 type C photograph, artist proof number 1 100.0 x 80.0 cm © Edson Chagas, courtesy Stevenson Gallery Johannesburg

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Edson Chagas Nadir T. Watemb, Tipo Passe series 2014 type C photograph, edition 4/5 100.0 x 80.0 cm © Edson Chagas, courtesy Stevenson Gallery Johannesburg

Einat Amir, Israel

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Einat Amir Coming Soon Near You 2011 Performance, Dallas Contemporary Art Center

Ephrem Solomon, Ethiopia
Estudio Campana / Yarrenyty Arltere Artists/ Elliat Rich, Brazil, Australia, France
Faig Ahmed, Azerbaijan
Formafantasma, Italy
Guo Pei, China
Hassan Hajjaj, Morocco
Iris van Herpen, The Netherlands

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Iris van Herpen, Paris (fashion house) Iris van Herpen (designer) Dress 2011 acrylic, nylon (tulle), metal 78.0 cm (centre back) 35.0 cm (waist, flat) National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Purchased with funds donated by Norma and Stuart Leslie, 2016 2016.594

Jonathan Owen, United Kingdom
Jorge Méndez Blake, Mexico
Joris Laarman, The Netherlands
Josephine Meckseper, Germany
Kay Hassan, South Africa
Kushana Bush, New Zealand
Louisa Bufardeci, Australia
Myoung Ho Lee, South Korea
Nathaniel Mellors, United Kingdom
Nendo, Japan

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Oki Sato, Chief Designer, Nendo

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Neri Oxman, Israel

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Neri Oxman Vespers 2016 Series 2 Mask 3 Designed by Neri Oxman and members of the Mediated Matter Group for The New Ancient Collection curated and 3D printed by Stratasys, 2016. Photo: Yoram Reshef.

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Neri Oxman Vespers 2016 Series 2 Mask 5 Designed by Neri Oxman and members of the Mediated Matter Group for The New Ancient Collection curated and 3D printed by Stratasys, 2016. Photo: Yoram Reshef. Courtesy of the Mediated Matter Group.

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Neri Oxman Vespers 2016 Series 2 Mask 1 Designed by Neri Oxman and members of the Mediated Matter Group for The New Ancient Collection curated and 3D printed by Stratasys, 2016. Photo: Yoram Reshef. Courtesy of the Mediated Matter Group.

Nick Cave, United States of America
Olaf Breuning, Switzerland
Olga Chernysheva, Russia
Pae White, United States of America
Pascale Marthine Tayou, Cameroon
Paulina Ołowska, Poland
PET Lamp/ Bula’bula Artists, Spain/Australia
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Mexico
Reko Rennie, Australia
Richard Giblett, Hong Kong
Richard Mosse, Ireland
Riley Payne, Australia
Ron Mueck, Australia
Sascha Braunig, Canada
Sean O’Connell, Australia
Shilpa Gupta, India

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Shilpa Gupta Untitled 2013 Thousands of microphones with multichannel audio 165 x 158 x 170 in| 430 x 350 x 400 cm Courtesy the artist & Galleria Continua / Le Moulin, San Gimignano / Beijing / Les Moulins / Habana

Sissel Tolaas, Norway
Tala Madani, Iran
teamLab, Japan
Timo Nasseri, Germany/Iran
Tom Crago, Australia

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Tom Crago and Tantalus Materials 2016–17 Mark Rodda The Sailing Ship 2014 (detail) Courtesy Tantalus, Melbourne Image courtesy the artist and Tantalus, Melbourne

Uji (Hahan) Handoko Eko Saputro, Indonesia
We Make Carpets, The Netherlands
Xu Zhen, China
Yamagami Yukihiro, Japan
Yayoi Kusama, Japan
Zanele Muholi, South Africa

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Zanele Muholi Ntozakhe II, Parktown 2016 Courtesy the artist and STEVENSON gallery, Johannesburg

DESIGN | Chadstone

DESIGN

I love movies, great packaging and fabulous interiors. When I go shopping I don’t look at the price, I look at the packaging – the prettier it is, the more willing I am to buy it. The same could be said for movie houses and the new Hoyts cinema at Chadstone Shopping Centre has to be the best I have seen ( well, Gold Class at Crown Casino is right up there ). I love the lolly bar and the choice of cafes, bars and restaurants at the cinema. Now going to see a movie is more of an experience and foodie adventure. The new expansion at Chadstone shopping centre is fantastic, the glass roof and atrium adds another dimension to the centre – the food court offers a large variety of meal choices and the detail to interior design sets Chadstone apart from other suburban shopping centres. I enjoyed walking around and making new discoveries which hopefully translates through in my pics:

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Event | Bulgari

NGV International | 30 Sept 2016 – 29 Jan 2017 | Free entry

The V.I.P.s (1963)Directed by Anthony Asquith Shown: Elizabeth Taylor

The V.I.P.s (1963) Directed by Anthony Asquith Shown: Elizabeth Taylor

A spectacular display of jewels from the Bulgari Heritage Collection, including emerald and diamond jewellery from the personal collection of Elizabeth Taylor and a ruby and diamond necklace worn by Sophia Loren, will be showcased in Italian Jewels: Bulgari Style.

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Necklace in gold with rubies and diamonds, 1994. Designed as row of cushion-shaped rubies within a frame of baguette and brilliant-cut diamonds in pavé settings supporting a second row of cushion-shaped rubies framed by diamonds and embellished by calibrated cut rubies. The necklace is set with 48 cushion-shaped rubies for a total weight of 59.33 carats. The necklace and the earrings were worn by Sophia Loren in the film Prêt-à-Porter (1994) by Robert Altman

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Earrings in gold with rubies and diamonds, 1994. Each of double Creole design, decorated with cushion-shaped and calibrated cut rubies, in a surround of baguette and brilliant-cut diamonds.

Drawn from Bulgari’s remarkable archives, the pieces highlight the Italian design house’s longstanding relationships with stars of Hollywood and Italian cinema, with a focus on the Dolce Vita period of the 50s and 60s when Rome was a popular location for Hollywood films.

The exhibition will feature more than 80 stunning pieces of jewellery alongside film and photography. Tony Ellwood, Director, NGV said: ‘Italian Jewels: Bulgari Style illustrates the bold design aesthetic of Bulgari through a selection of exquisite gems worn by iconic stars such as Elizabeth Taylor and Ingrid Bergman. The exhibition thematically explores design motifs for which the firm is best known – the serpent, ancient coins and striking color combinations, among others.’

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“Snake” bracelet-watch in yellow gold with emeralds and diamonds, ca 1965. The coiled body designed as alternate rows of scales decorated respectively with brilliant-cut diamonds and guilloché green enamel, the hinged head, opens to reveal the circular white argentè dial and is set with a cushion-shaped emerald and pear-shaped diamond eyes. Circular gold case; back case with crown winder and applied white gold dart-shaped indexes; logo Jaeger LeCoultre printed in black; white gold sword-shaped hands. On the reverse of the head “BVLGARI” engraved; back case numbered “813070”, near the reverse of the neck “SM 6,62 CTS” engraved for the carat weight of the emerald. Total weight 286,60 grams.

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Necklace in two-color gold with diamonds and Florentine Renaissance bronze coin, ca 1978. Designed as a chain of filed curb linking, at the centre a shield-shaped motif decorated with a fleur de lys pavé-set with brilliant-cut diamonds and a Testoon of Alexander de Medici. Marks: on the reverse of the clasp: “BVLGARI / ? ITALY”; on the security catch numbered: “570”; on the tonguepiece “750”; hexagonal frame with addorsed “BB” monogram; the reverse of the coin bezel: ” – ALEXANDER OF MEDICI FLORENCE 1521. 1537. TESTOON – MOULD BY BENVENUTO CELLINI – ” engraved.

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“Bib” necklace in gold with emeralds, amethysts, turquoises and diamonds, 1965. The necklace, in the form of an articulated bib, is decorated with teardrop motifs set with 84 turquoises: ca. 38 carats (total), 37 cabochon emeralds for a total of ca. 72 carats , 27 amethysts: ca. 77 carats (total) and 937 brilliant-cut diamonds: ca. 57 carats (total), mounted in 18 kt gold; the matching pendent earclips are of cascade design, all items mounted in 18 kt gold. Formerly in the collection of Lyn Revson. This necklace is the object of a special edition of 3,500,000 stamps – the “Made in Italy” series – issued by the Poste Italiane to celebrate the Bulgari’s 125th anniversary. Marks: on the reverse of the clasp: “BVLGARI” engraved; on the tongue-piece: hexagonal frame with addorsed “BB” monogram; lozenge with “750”; on the side of the mount: two “eagle’s head”.

Lucia Boscaini, Bulgari Brand and Heritage Curator, remarked: ‘Spanning from the 1930s until today, the works illustrate a strong design heritage and aesthetic evolution, deeply entrenched in Italian history and artisanal traditions. Italian Jewels: Bulgari Style showcases the glamour of a Golden Age of cinema and design, and represents Bulgari’s constant experimentation and inimitable aesthetic codes.’

Highlights include jewels presented to Taylor by her paramour and fifth husband Richard Burton, including an emerald ring he gifted when their love affair first began in Rome on the set of Cleopatra (1963). Bulgari creations favoured by leading women such as Grace Kelly, Anita Ekberg and Gina Lollobrigida will also be showcased, as well as stunning jewels worn on the red carpet by Hollywood stars including Keira Knightley.

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Necklace in platinum with emeralds and diamonds, 1962. Magnificent necklace in platinum and emeralds of 1962. It is mounted with 16 step-cut octagonal Colombian emeralds for an estimated total of 60.50 carats, each in a surround of brilliant-cut and pear-shaped diamonds. Taylor received it as a wedding gift from her husband Richard Burton in 1964. The pendent element with the step-cut Colombian emerald of 23.44 carats, created by Bulgari in 1958 as a brooch, was given to Elizabeth Taylor by Burton for their engagement in 1962 and worn by the actress in their wedding day in 1964. The actress was then immortalized in the necklace in 1966, when she received the Oscar as best actress. Marks: on the reverse of the clasp: “BVLGARI” engraved.

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Ring in platinum with emerald and diamonds, 1961. Ring in platinum with a step-cut octagonal emerald of ca. 7.40 carats; the 12 pear-shaped diamonds have a total weight of ca. 5.30 carats. Created by Bulgari in 1962, it was the first jewel that Elizabeth Taylor received from Richard Burton in Rome during the filming of Cleopatra, when their “scandalous” love story started. From then on, the stellar couple visited the Bulgari store very frequently, because Richard Burton used any and every occasion to give her a jewel. Once the actress told that she felt she was the custodian of her jewels, watching over them and loving them. Jewels were a source of pure happiness for her and she adored wearing them, because she could then share with others their magic powers of joy and excitement. The actress sold it in 2002 at a charity auction for “The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation” and in a letter addressed to the new owners, Taylor wrote “Wear it with love!”. Marks: inside the shank: numbered 358-50.

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“Tremblant” brooch in platinum with emeralds and diamonds, 1960. The brooch was probably given to Elizabeth Taylor by Eddie Fischer, her husband at the time and was worn both as a brooch and hair ornament. On the “tremblant”pieces, flowerheads are mounted on spring settings which allow them to flicker at every movement, thus marvelously radiating their light. Since the 18°  century, realistic floral motifs had been a constant theme in French jewellery. In the early 1960s, Bulgari rivalled the finest Parisian jewellers in creating these asymmetrical sprays. Marks: on the clip mechanism: mark (illegible legible); “DEPOSÉ”.

Other highlights include delicate tremblant brooches, so called because of small springs in the jewellery designs which create a quivering effect, such as a floral hair piece worn by Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman when she starred in The Visit (1964). Sautoirs from the 1970s and pieces featuring cabochon cut gems in chromatic combinations will also convey Bulgari’s unique style.

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“Tremblant” brooch in platinum with diamonds, 1958. The brooch is set with baguette, brilliant- and navette cut diamonds, the flower-head clusters are ‘en tremblant’, mounted 18 kt white gold and platinum. The brooch is mounted with 216 diamonds of various shapes and cuts for a total estimated weight of 46.5 carats Marks: on the rim of the mount (stem): “BVLGARI” engraved; two rectangular marks with “philosopher head”; on the pin: “OR”; oval with “owl”.

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“Tremblant” brooch in platinum with fancy yellow diamonds and diamonds, 1960. The brooch is set with 267 colourless diamonds and variously shaped coloured diamonds ranging from golden yellow to cognac hues, mounted in platinum.Marks: on the clip mechanism: “BVLGARI” engraved; on the prongs: “OR / 750 / P”.

The story of Bulgari stretches back more than a century, when Greek silversmith Sotirio Bulgari came to Rome to seek his fortune, opening his first shop in 1884. From humble beginnings, Bulgari rose to become an emblem of Italian excellence and creativity, favoured by royalty, actresses and high society alike. Drawing inspiration from its Greek and Roman heritage, Bulgari has forged a distinct style that combines tradition and innovation.

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“Playing Card” sautoir in gold with coral, mother-of-pearl, onyx and diamonds, 1972. Designed as a chain of oval links, each inset at the centre with a spade motif respectively in red coral, mother-of-pearl and onyx, the front suspending an oval coral pendant depicting a the king in the guise of French playing cards with an onyx spade motif as crown. Marks: Chain: on the reverse of the mount (penultimate link): “BULGARI” engraved; on the clasp and on the rim of the mount: four ovals with “owl”; on the rim of the mount (penultimate link): lozenge with “square / P / & / Fils”; polygon with “square / P & Fils / 18K”. Pendant: on the rim of the mount: oval with “owl”; on the reverse of the mount, at the centre: polygon with ” square / P & Fils / 18K. Bracelet: on the reverse of the mount (penultimate link): “BULGARI” engraved; on the clasp: oval with “owl”; lozenge with “square / P / & / Fils”; polygon (partially legible) with ” ? / s / K”; on the rim of the mount (end link): lozenge with “square / P / & / Fils”; polygon with “square / P & Fils / 18K”.

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Bracelet in gold with sapphires and diamonds, 1960. Designed as an articulated band composed of oval cabochon and facetted sapphires of light and dark hues, highlighted by brilliant-cut diamonds. Marks: Bracelet: on the reverse of the clasp: “BVLGARI” engraved.

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Bracelets in platinum with diamonds, respectively 1955 and 1959. Designed as a succession of nine bombé oval shaped motifs, each with a brilliant-cut diamond at the centre within a surround of pave-set stones, and connect by arch-shaped links set with baguette diamonds. Formerly in the collection of Ellen Barkin Marks: on the reverse of an oval element, on an applied plaque: “BVLGARI” stamped; hexagonal frame with addorsed “BB” monogram; “Pt 950″; polygon with ” Pt 950″; on the tonguepiece: “eagle’s head”; four “dog’s head”; “OR”; “R / star / S”; on the reverse of the clasp: numbered “1”.

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Necklace in gold and platinum with rubies, emeralds, sapphires and diamonds, ca 1959. The front formed of a succession of diamond-set V-shaped motifs supporting a fringe of cabochon emeralds, rubies and sapphires and brilliant-cut diamonds, the back is designed as line of further cabochon emeralds, rubies and sapphires. Unmarked.

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“Melone” evening bag in gold with sapphire, 1972. The polished and fluted oval case with cabochon sapphire thumbpiece, opening to reveal a fitted mirror, suspended on a golden colour silk cord terminating with a tassel. The interior is fitted with an oval mirror. With a golden coloured silk cord and tassel. Marks: on the rim (interior): “BVLGARI” stamped; lozenge with “750”.

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Necklace in gold with emerald, amethysts, rubies and diamonds, 1989. Designed as a tapering articulated band decorated with foliate motifs set with cabochon amethysts highlighted by channel-set calibré cut rubies and baguette diamonds, the centre collet-set with an oval cabochon emerald. The cabochon Colombian emerald weighs 41.14 carats. Marks: on the reverse of the security catch: “BVLGARI” engraved; on the tongue-piece: hexagonal frame with addorsed “BB” monogram; heptagon with “head of Saint Bernard dog”; on the reverse of the bezel, at the centre: “BVLGARI” engraved; “41.14 cts” engraved for the carat weight of the emerald.

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“Melone” evening bag in gold and burnished steel with diamonds, ca 1972. The polished gold case inset with burnished steel forming a geometrical pattern, the thumbpiece set with circular-cut diamonds, opening to real suspended on a black silk cord terminating with a tassel. Formerly in the collection of Lyn Revson With a blue silk cord and tassel. Marks: on the hinged polygonal suspension loop: “BVLGARI” stamped; on the rim (interior): numbered “637”; lozenge with “750 “; shaped mark with CIF”.

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Sautoir in gold with yellow and blue sapphires, agate, citrines and diamonds, ca 1972. The sautoir is designed as a gold chain of filed curb linking decorated at intervals with oval elements alternatively set with cabochon sapphires and citrines, the front supports a circular pendant set at the centre with a cushion-shaped yellow sapphire within a border of brilliant-cut diamonds, shaped banded blue agate, four cabochon sapphires and brilliant-cut diamonds, the pendant may be detached and worn separately as a brooch. Pendant engraved: BVLGARI 750 (in a lozenge). Chain stamped on the clasp: BVLGARI 750. NB clip fitting on the clasp.

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Necklace in gold with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967. The front decorated with 10 large floral clusters set with 25 cabochon sapphires for a total of ca. 67 carats; 71 cabochon emeralds ca. 48 carats (total); 88 cabochon rubies ca. 75 carats (total); 348 brilliant-cut diamonds ca. 22.5 carats (total). The back formed of similarly set foliate motifs. Marks: on the tongue-piece: “BVLGARI” engraved; inside the clasp: “750”; “eagle’s head”; “SC”; lozenge with “R / star / D /”.

Italian Jewels: Bulgari Style will be on display at NGV International from 30 September 2016 – 29 January 2017. Open daily, 10am-5pm. Entry is free.

Organised by the National Gallery of Victoria in collaboration with Bulgari Heritage.

Why We Melbourne

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DESIGN | NGV CarWash

A playful reinvention of the suburban car wash has been announced as the winner of the 2016 NGV Architecture Commission with Melbourne based M@ STUDIO Architects’ winning entry “Haven’t you always wanted to run through all that foam at the car lovers?”

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M@ STUDIO Car Wash 2016 NGV Architecture Commission

With dimensions taken directly from an existing car wash in Blackburn, Melbourne, the design transplants an object of everyday use and familiarity into the unfamiliar surroundings of an art gallery. In place of cement and fluorescent lighting, the structure will have a lightweight steel body with walls made of layered cricket netting and a translucent polycarbonate roof.

The evocative structure will include five ‘bays’ with lanes of bright pink astro turf complete with rubberised humps and road markings. Topped by a glittering ‘car wash’ sign and illuminated at night, the spaces will be used for events, talks, live music performances and more over spring and summer as well as providing a place for Melburnians to gather, play and daydream. The whimsical structure will also include two bays replete with hanging curtains of red plastic, while another will diffuse mist recreating the experience of being at the car wash.

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M@ STUDIO Car Wash 2016 NGV Architecture Commission

M@ STUDIO Architects commented, ‘We are thrilled to be selected as the winner of the 2016 NGV Architecture Commission. Open competitions such as this provide a vital platform for architects to experiment and facilitate public discourse around the broader ideas that motivate the specific design explorations.’

The NGV Architecture Commission is an annual open competition which asks architects to consider innovative ways to activate one of Melbourne’s great civic spaces, the Grollo Equiset Garden, with a thought-provoking work of temporary architecture. Competitors are encouraged to offer a unique response to the site, explore new propositions about architecture and design, and demonstrate innovation in material use, fabrication, sustainability and recyclability.

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M@ STUDIO Car Wash 2016 NGV Architecture Commission

The 2016 competition was judged by Corbett Lyon (Lyons Architecture), Rachel Neeson (Neeson Murcutt Architects), Emma Williamson (CODA) and Fleur Watson (RMIT Design Hub), with Andrew Mackenzie of City Lab acting as competition advisor. The competition consisted of an anonymous Stage One where five projects were shortlisted from an entry pool of 93. In Stage Two the shortlisted entrants presented a resolved design to be assessed on quality, originality and viability.

Led by the Department of Contemporary Design and Architecture, the inaugural Architecture Commission was presented in 2015 by John Wardle Architects, who designed an exuberant pavilion of steel, timber and hand-formed textile elements. Taking inspiration from the Sidney Myer Music Bowl, the pavilion lifts dramatically on high arches to form an open-sided, shaded space. The 2016 NGV Architecture Commission will be on display at NGV International from October 2016.

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M@ STUDIO Car Wash 2016 NGV Architecture Commission

FASHION | D&G

 

Few designers take a theme and run with it quite like Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana and for fall, they were dead set on bringing a fashion fairy tale to life — literally. Upon entering the show venue on Sunday afternoon in Milan, guests were transported into a Disney-themed wonderland, complete with well-loved objects from classic movies — Aladdin’s red carpet, Cinderella’s pumpkin, the magic mirror from Snow White — and a soundtrack of the films’ most catchy tunes, like “Under the Sea.” Models walked onto the runway through a giant open storybook, with a gilded carriage and flower-filled candelabras serving as the rest of the backdrop.

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EVENT | Undie Run

Cupid’s Undie Run is a 1.5k (ish) run in your bedroom-best on Valentine’s weekend in St Kilda – Melbourne, thereby raising money for the Children’s Tumour Foundation of Australia. They raised more than $150,000 in donations in 2014 and close to $160,000 in 2015.

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Why We Melbourne

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DESIGN | Fancy Nance

Flamingo tea parties and baguette-shaped lounges are among the quirky design features of Adriano Zumbo‘s new salon, Fancy Nance. Designed by newly formed interior architecture practice Studio Tate, Zumbo’s latest venture features his signature pink accents in a bespoke interior. Having previously noticed the practice through a quirky Instagram competition, the celebrity pâtissier of MasterChef fame approached Studio Tate to transform the South Yarra shopfront into a hybrid cafe and cocktail bar.

The space’s dual function has led to an adaptable and playful design, allowing a seamless transformation from experimental cafe by day, to an avant-garde cocktail lounge by night. The aesthetic of Zumbo’s extravagantly stylish mother, whom Fancy Nance derives its name from, has inspired Studio Tate to create a diverse, multi-functional venue full of lush, playful furnishings and bold pops of colour. “Our design draws upon the whimsical concept of Nancy the Fancy Flamingo. With her lush feathers and graceful legs, Nancy guides the tone of the venue, which takes on a personality in line with the iconic Zumbo brand,” says Alex Hopkins, Principal and co-founder of Studio Tate.

The contour of flamingo feathers, as well as Zumbo’s architecturally sculpted cakes, have informed the design and crafted a visual language of curves, cut into the metal framework and high-gloss surfaces of each custom made cabinet. This myriad of aesthetic considerations and influences is tied together in collaboration with local graffiti artist Daniel Wenn, whose illustrations of the Mad Hatter’s tea party have been populated by flamingos. These murals are painted on the low dividing walls that separate the coffee and macaron wonderland from Fancy Nance’s nighttime bar area, where mood lighting takes the form of hanging teacup pendants by local designer Suzie Stanford.

21 Daly Street, South Yarra, Melbourne.

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Fancy Nance. Images courtesy of Studio Tate.

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Fancy Nance. Images courtesy of Studio Tate.

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Fancy Nance. Images courtesy of Studio Tate.

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Fancy Nance. Images courtesy of Studio Tate.

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Fancy Nance. Images courtesy of Studio Tate.

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Fancy Nance. Images courtesy of Studio Tate.

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Fancy Nance. Images courtesy of Studio Tate.

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Fancy Nance. Images courtesy of Studio Tate.

DESIGN | Bond Bar

The original BOND was built within an existing car-park. Its character and appeal were derived from its dimensions – long and low, and removed from the busy CBD surrounds. Bond’s owners wanted this character to be maintained but modernised, and made once again synonymous with luxury and exclusivity.

Bond beautifully illustrates the integration of practicality within luxury, and it promotes the potential for interior design to keep pace with technological advancement. An intuitive space, it gives its users – both staff and patrons – choice and autonomy. Thanks to HACHEM our city has yet another glamorous bar, Melburnians can never have enough.

  • Location: 24 Bond Street, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
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Bond. © Shania Shegedyn

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Bond. © Shania Shegedyn

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Bond. © Shania Shegedyn

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Bond. © Shania Shegedyn

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2015 Eat Drink Design Awards

The 2015 Eat Drink Design Awards were announced at a cocktail party on 17 November 2015 at Melbourne’s 64 Sutton event space. Australia and New Zealand’s design and hospitality communities came together to celebrate the best designed restaurants, cafes, bars, temporary environments, retail spaces for food and drink and visual identities for all. From a record number of entries, 88 were shortlisted. From this shortlist, seven projects have been awarded best design in six categories, and twenty-six received high commendations. We would like to extend our congratulations to the Melbourne winners as listed below:

Best Bar Design

Smalls – Fiona Lynch Office

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Best Cafe Design

The Kettle Black – Studio You Me

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Wearing The Interior City

Students from Monash University Art Design and Architecture (MADA) have created 11 works of wearable architecture for the 2015 Wearing the City project. The project challenged students to reinterpret Melbourne’s iconic interiors, from the historic to the contemporary, at a scale for the human body.

This year, a group of architecture and fine art students worked with architect Cate Hall and fashion designer Miriam Borcherdt to design the pieces. Geometric forms were a common feature among this year’s projects, with many of the architectural hallmarks in the interior spaces echoed in the costume designs.

Students compete head-to-head in a catwalk contest at MPavilion, Saturday 14 November, 5–7pm to be judged by a panel of multi-disciplinary jurors. A winner will be announced on the night.

The Quays (McBride Charles Ryan) - Students: Emily McBain, Yoana Doleva. Photography by Matthew Stanton

The Quays (McBride Charles Ryan) – Students: Emily McBain, Yoana Doleva. Photography by Matthew Stanton

Myer Melbourne interior Chasm (NH Architecture) by Ruben Digby-Diercks and Matthew Luong. Image: Matthew Stanton

Myer Melbourne interior Chasm (NH Architecture) by Ruben Digby-Diercks and Matthew Luong. Image: Matthew Stanton

Baker D. Chirico Carlton (March Studio) - Students: Qianying Weng, Jesse Oehm, Lily Fong . Photography by Matthew Stanton

Baker D. Chirico Carlton (March Studio) – Students: Qianying Weng, Jesse Oehm, Lily Fong . Photography by Matthew Stanton

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Capitol Theatre (Marion Mahony Griffin and Walter Burley Griffin) – Students: Luke Lim, Caitlin Wallace. Photography by Matthew Stanton

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NGV Great Hall (Roy Grounds/ Ceiling: Leonard French) – Students: Ken Wu, Isabella Alvarado. Photography by Matthew Stanton

Main foyer 171 Collins St. (Bates Smart) – Students: Cecilia Young, Alisha Vasudevan. Photography by Matthew Stanton

Main foyer 171 Collins St. (Bates Smart) – Students: Cecilia Young, Alisha Vasudevan. Photography by Matthew Stanton

Heide II (McGlashan Everist) – Students: Melissa Brown, Tess McLaren, Eastina Zhang. Photography by Matthew Stanton

Heide II (McGlashan Everist) – Students: Melissa Brown, Tess McLaren, Eastina Zhang. Photography by Matthew Stanton

NAB docklands (Woods Bagot) by Isabella Peppard Clark. Image: Matthew Stanton

NAB docklands (Woods Bagot) by Isabella Peppard Clark. Image: Matthew Stanton

Hamer Hall (Roy Grounds/ Interior: John Truscott, upgrade by ARM) - Students: KiaAchilleos, Celina San Jose. Photography by Matthew Stanton

Hamer Hall (Roy Grounds/ Interior: John Truscott, upgrade by ARM) – Students: KiaAchilleos, Celina San Jose. Photography by Matthew Stanton

St Paul’s Cathedral (William Butterfield) Outfit by students: Monique Woods, Hoai My Linh Duong, Nicole White

St Paul’s Cathedral (William Butterfield) Outfit by students: Monique Woods, Hoai My Linh Duong, Nicole White

Shrine of Remembrance – Galleries of Remembrance (ARM Architecture) - Students: Melissa Parker, James Zhao Jin Yan, Julia Quirk. Photography by Matthew Stanton

Shrine of Remembrance – Galleries of Remembrance (ARM Architecture) – Students: Melissa Parker, James Zhao Jin Yan, Julia Quirk. Photography by Matthew Stanton

Hamer Hall (Roy Grounds/ Interior: John Truscott, upgrade by ARM) - Students: KiaAchilleos, Celina San Jose. Photography by Matthew Stanton

Hamer Hall (Roy Grounds/ Interior: John Truscott, upgrade by ARM) – Students: KiaAchilleos, Celina San Jose. Photography by Matthew Stanton

Brighton Beach

Why We Melbourne – Brighton Beach:

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

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Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Brighton Beach, Melbourne, Australia. © oh.yes.melbourne

Oktoberfest 2015

Inspired by our love of the traditional Bavarian festival and great beer, Oktoberfest in the Gardens features a massive beer hall, authentic German food stalls, roving performers, sideshow alley, silent disco and an eclectic mix of entertainment and competitions across multiple stages throughout the afternoon and evening. We were there and we would love to share a small sample of the pics we took – enjoy:

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Oktoberfest in the Gardens 2015, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Why We Melbourne

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

© oh yes melbourne.

DESIGN | Yarn Corner

Yarn Corner is a Melbourne based group of enthusiastic knitters, who call themselves “yarn bombers”. The group was formed back in 2011 by fibre artist Bali of Twilight Taggers, and has been bombing the streets of Melbourne with splashes of colour and thread, as well as creating personal projects and commission based jobs.

Yarn Corner’s latest installation is now showing at Queen Victoria Market. You will see trees sporting the nicest, most colourful outfits, intricate shapes and patterns decorating their long trunks. Enjoy the pics:

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Yarn Corner at Queen Victoria Market. © oh.yes.melbourne.

DESIGN | Icon

Icon St Kilda is an 18-storey apartment tower that  looks like a stack of colourful Lego blocks. Designed by Jackson Clements Burrows, ‘The Icon’ will rise 56 metres into the Port Phillip skyline in six modular tiers, wrapped in different coloured powder coated mesh screens.

The Icon St Kilda designed by Jackson Clements Burrows.

The Icon St Kilda designed by Jackson Clements Burrows.

The Icon will house 119 apartments within its stacked boxes and JCB director Andrew Jackson says that the building’s layout encourages a communitarian style of living, different from the one encouraged by singular extrusion style apartment buildings.

“Most apartment buildings are just a singular extrusion, so we saw this as an opportunity by seeing it as a series of stacked elements or stacked boxes so that the building would read very differently,” says Jackson in an advertising video.

“Each different box represents a different neighbourhood and each neighbourhood has its own colour… and that’s about giving identity to what we imagine to be different communities within the building.”

“So it was a way of thinking about an apartment building not just as a singular entity but a collection of communities.”

The Icon St Kilda designed by Jackson Clements Burrows.

The screens are double powder coated and coloured in violet, indigo blue, moss green and luminous yellow. They also continue to the undersides of the stacked boxes and onto the ceilings of communal areas. Behind the mesh are Kingspan Insulated Panels and precast concrete panels that will form the structural exterior wall.

The Icon St Kilda designed by Jackson Clements Burrows.

The Icon St Kilda designed by Jackson Clements Burrows.

The Icon’s facilities will include a Teppanyaki Barbeque Deck, a common Dining Room, two kitchen areas, and a communal lounge area with suspended fireplace and gym facilities.

The Icon St Kilda designed by Jackson Clements Burrows.

The Icon St Kilda designed by Jackson Clements Burrows.

The Icon St Kilda designed by Jackson Clements Burrows.

The Icon St Kilda designed by Jackson Clements Burrows.

Issey Miyake Spring 2016

Yoshiyuke Miyamae’s springy, undulating pieces were sheer happiness in a dress, taking Issey Miyake’s famous pleating to a new level of sophistication and charm.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

© Issey Miyake Spring 2016.

Melbourne Spring Series

© oh.yes.melbourne

© oh.yes.melbourne

© oh.yes.melbourne

© oh.yes.melbourne

© oh.yes.melbourne

© oh.yes.melbourne

© oh.yes.melbourne

© oh.yes.melbourne

© oh.yes.melbourne

© oh.yes.melbourne

© oh.yes.melbourne

1 Victoria Street (BoM)

Back in June ideas were sought from the Melbourne community for the small yet very prominent plot of land formerly occupied by the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM). The process for making a submission was necessarily broad, the terms vague, and attempted to limit conceptual work to only a few pages, providing some idea of the embodied cost of construction and likely return on investment. The interpretation of these parameters by different agencies was almost as creative as their actual content.

Overall, this exercise in crowdsourcing has returned a broad palette of ideas in a variety of formats. Some have proffered a few pithy lines, some have agonised over a three page, high definition submission that could fill three major billboards, while still others have provided up to six separate concepts! All of them, creative, thoughtful, and a real delight.

In particular,  a few individuals and agencies engaged with the purpose and mission of the Royal Society of Victoria to promote the practice and understanding of science in Victoria, finding ways to align concepts with our key goals.

There are repeated themes of sculptures, iconic monuments, lecture theatres, green rooftops and cafes, along with didactic displays and education centres relating to the sciences. Some present architectural elements that are in themselves highly inclusive of technology. Some are simply unique! These concepts are presented below. You can also view the individual and company designs as well as vote for your favourite proposal HERE.

Let’s start with our favourite proposal:

  1. Simple Studio – “STEAM Gallery”

This agency proposes to explore the formal idea of activating the site by creating public open space housing a subterranean gallery space.

Simple Studio – “STEAM Gallery”

Simple Studio – “STEAM Gallery”

Simple Studio – “STEAM Gallery”

Simple Studio – “STEAM Gallery”

Simple Studio – “STEAM Gallery”

Simple Studio – “STEAM Gallery”

2. Chris Barnes, Teuta Jerliu, Lily Jiang – “The Bureau”

This team of three propose a “brand new Science & Learning facility that offers the
opportunity for flexible workshops & exhibitions for the people of Melbourne.”

Chris Barnes, Teuta Jerliu, Lily Jiang – “The Bureau”

Chris Barnes, Teuta Jerliu, Lily Jiang – “The Bureau”

Chris Barnes, Teuta Jerliu, Lily Jiang – “The Bureau”

Chris Barnes, Teuta Jerliu, Lily Jiang – “The Bureau”

Chris Barnes, Teuta Jerliu, Lily Jiang – “The Bureau”

Chris Barnes, Teuta Jerliu, Lily Jiang – “The Bureau”

3. Tom Chan, Marris Dibley, Jenna Rowe – Public Lecture Theatre and Cafe

This team of three propose to “relocate the face of the Royal Society into a state of the art lecture facility right on the most prominent corner of the site,” “redevelop the existing heritage building into the operations base, library and archival facility for the full measure of the Society’s history” and “reposition the Society’s lecture programme into a series of lectures directed for consumption by the wider public.”

Tom Chan, Marris Dibley, Jenna Rowe – Public Lecture Theatre and Cafe

Tom Chan, Marris Dibley, Jenna Rowe – Public Lecture Theatre and Cafe

Tom Chan, Marris Dibley, Jenna Rowe – Public Lecture Theatre and Cafe

Tom Chan, Marris Dibley, Jenna Rowe – Public Lecture Theatre and Cafe

Tom Chan, Marris Dibley, Jenna Rowe – Public Lecture Theatre and Cafe

Tom Chan, Marris Dibley, Jenna Rowe – Public Lecture Theatre and Cafe

4. Nigel Westbrook, Paul Evans & Michael Wentworth-Bell – “Museum of the Hoddle Grid”

This is our 2nd favourite proposal. The team of three proposes to establish a facility to present and explore the history and development of the City of Melbourne, incorporating a green roof area, a “camera obscura” and a rooftop “weather bar and cafe” that incorporates weather data instruments.

Nigel Westbrook, Paul Evans & Michael Wentworth-Bell – “Museum of the Hoddle Grid”

Nigel Westbrook, Paul Evans & Michael Wentworth-Bell – “Museum of the Hoddle Grid”

Nigel Westbrook, Paul Evans & Michael Wentworth-Bell – “Museum of the Hoddle Grid”

Nigel Westbrook, Paul Evans & Michael Wentworth-Bell – “Museum of the Hoddle Grid”

Nigel Westbrook, Paul Evans & Michael Wentworth-Bell – “Museum of the Hoddle Grid”

Nigel Westbrook, Paul Evans & Michael Wentworth-Bell – “Museum of the Hoddle Grid”

5. Room 11 – “Telescope”

This agency proposes to “design a unique passive and public telescope that incorporates site specific physical and exporatory notions,” “refit the interior of the existing Royal Society Building,” and refurbish & reinvigorate the Caretaker’s Cottage.

Room 11 - Telescope.

Room 11 – Telescope.

Room 11 - Telescope.

Room 11 – Telescope.

Room 11 - Telescope.

Room 11 – Telescope.

6. Studio505 – “Anti-Consensus Centre”

This agency proposes to project the “once internalised weather dials and data” out onto a large public display that will reinforce the impact of anthropogenic climate change.

Studio505 – “Anti-Consensus Centre”

Studio505 – “Anti-Consensus Centre”

Studio505 – “Anti-Consensus Centre”

Studio505 – “Anti-Consensus Centre”

7.  Studio505 – “Atom”

This agency proposes a “central hub for scientific & rational thought in Melbourne” by establishing “a spectacle” to “create cultural icons and foster a sense of community” for Victoria’s science tribes.

Studio505 – “Atom”

Studio505 – “Atom”

Studio505 – “Atom”

Studio505 – “Atom”

Studio505 – “Atom”

Studio505 – “Atom”

8. Studio505 – “THE HIVE Drone Launch Facility”

This agency proposes to establish a hive-like facility to launch drones that will deliver products from factory to door within minutes rather than days.

Studio505-Drone-Launch-Facility

Studio505 – “THE HIVE Drone Launch Facility”

Studio505 – “THE HIVE Drone Launch Facility”

Studio505 – “THE HIVE Drone Launch Facility”

Studio505 – “THE HIVE Drone Launch Facility”

Studio505 – “THE HIVE Drone Launch Facility”

Studio505 – “THE HIVE Drone Launch Facility”

Studio505 – “THE HIVE Drone Launch Facility”

9. Studio505 – “The Three Elements”

This agency proposes to establish a concept based on the scientific branches of mathematics, physics & chemistry. The facility will create “a collaborative environment where public can directly interact with scientists through a multiplicity of workshops”

Studio505 – “The Three Elements”

Studio505 – “The Three Elements”

Studio505 – “The Three Elements”

Studio505 – “The Three Elements”

Studio505 – “The Three Elements”

Studio505 – “The Three Elements”

Studio505 – “The Three Elements”

Studio505 – “The Three Elements”

10. The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

This agency proposes to build “a structure on the site with the appearance of an Arctic Exploration ship, cutting through the intersection of 2 roads like a ship cutting through the ice.” The facility would incorporate a digital gallery a speaker’s corner and an information centre for science in Victoria, with upper levels incorporating a cafe/bar with rooftop deck.

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

The Space Agency – “Mawson’s Point”

11. Studio505 – “Magnetic Museum”

This agency agrees with Magnus, 4, who asserts “more magnets” would make Melbourne a better place. They propose “the first ever ‘magnetic museum,’ a large hovering exhibition space that shall hold rotating exhibition that centre around themes of the ephemeral, artistic and experiential.”

Studio505 – “Magnetic Museum”

Studio505 – “Magnetic Museum”

Studio505 – “Magnetic Museum”

Studio505 – “Magnetic Museum”

Studio505 – “Magnetic Museum”

Studio505 – “Magnetic Museum”

12. Studio505 – “Recontour”

This is our 3rd favourite proposal. The agency proposes to establish an Indigenous roof garden “to promote & educate the user on Indigenous Australian seasons” and supply a cafe beneath with fresh produce. A “functional water sculpture” is the primary focus of the site.

Studio505 – “Recontour”

Studio505 – “Recontour”

Studio505 – “Recontour”

Studio505 – “Recontour”

Studio505 – “Recontour”

Studio505 – “Recontour”

Studio505 – “Recontour”

Studio505 – “Recontour”

Studio505 – “Recontour”

Studio505 – “Recontour”

Vote and let us know which is your favourite proposal:

Harmony Garden

Mirvac, in collaboration with Simon Ellis Landscape Architects and artists Neil McLachlan and Emilia Storm, has developed an integrated art and landscape play environment at Point Park called Harmony Garden. The first of its kind in Melbourne, Harmony Garden features flower bells, lantern bells and a music wall comprising a harmony of gongs. Go and make music with your children at Yarra’s Edge in Docklands, they will love it.

Harmony Garden, Yarra's Edge - Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra’s Edge – Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra's Edge - Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra’s Edge – Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra's Edge - Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra’s Edge – Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra's Edge - Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra’s Edge – Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra's Edge - Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra’s Edge – Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra's Edge - Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra’s Edge – Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra's Edge - Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra’s Edge – Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra's Edge - Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra’s Edge – Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra's Edge - Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra’s Edge – Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra's Edge - Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne

Harmony Garden, Yarra’s Edge – Docklands, Melbourne. © oh.yes.melbourne