The Language of Ornament

The Language of Ornament explores the history of ornament in the Western design tradition. It examines a series of motifs, charting their appearance and reappearance in design from antiquity through to the twenty-first century. A wide range of artworks illustrate how motifs have been translated from one medium to another and have been borrowed and reinterpreted over the centuries.

Works in the exhibition range from eighteenth-century Wedgwood ceramics copying motifs from ancient Greek vases to a postmodern tea service by Michael Graves drawing on Classical architectural forms. The putto figure, a chubby male child dating from Classical antiquity, was a popular motif from the Renaissance period onwards. Essentially a secular, ornamental motif, it occurs continually through the early modern period right down to the twentieth century, referenced through a broad range of media including prints, sculpture and ceramics. The exhibition encompasses a rich selection of works from the NGV Collection including ceramics, glass, metalwork, furniture, textiles, prints and contemporary design and pop culture.

FREE ENTRY
NGV INTERNATIONAL
LEVEL 2, DECORATIVE ARTS PASSAGE
24 FEB – DEC
OPEN 10AM–5PM DAILY

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Event | NGV TRIENNIAL

More than 60 artists from over 30 countries, including Ron Mueck, Yayoi Kusama, Guo Pei, Richard Mosse, Ben Quilty, Neri Oxman, PET Lamp and Bula’bula Artists were announced yesterday as part of the inaugural NGV Triennial, an unprecedented global showcase of art, design and architecture set to open at NGV International on 15 December 2017 – 15 April 2018.

The FREE, Melbourne-exclusive exhibition will traverse all four levels of NGV International and display art and design together, from 3D printing and robotics, to performance, film, painting, drawing, fashion design, tapestry and sculpture. The exhibition will also present work from regions not strongly represented in the NGV’s current holdings including Africa, South America and the Middle East.

Argentinian artist Alexandra Kehayoglou travelled to Melbourne for today’s announcement, appearing with her major 8m-long work No Longer Creek. Using her family’s traditional carpet-making techniques, Kehayoglou documents the effects of human activity upon landscapes in Argentina in her intricate and large-scale works.

Bruce Armstrong Sculptures at NGV Australia

Bruce Armstrong Sculptures at NGV Australia

Twenty major new works have been commissioned by the NGV for the NGV Triennial including:
Alexandra Kehayoglou (Argentina) – using her family’s traditional carpet-making techniques, a monumental 100m2 carpet landscape titled Santa Cruz River that documents one of Argentina’s most contested landscapes

Bruce Armstrong Sculptures at NGV Australia

Bruce Armstrong Sculptures at NGV Australia

Candice Breitz (South Africa) – a new video work that reveals the personal histories of six refugees, which sees Hollywood actors Julianne Moore and Alec Baldwin give voice to their stories to bring the privilege of celebrity into contrast with the hardship of the refugee experience

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Candice Breitz Stills from Love Story, 2016 Featuring Julianne Moore and Alec Baldwin Interviewee: Sarah Ezzat Mardini 7-Channel Installation: 7 Hard Drives Commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria (Melbourne), Outset Germany (Berlin) and the Medienboard Berlin-Brandenburg

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Candice Breitz Stills from Love Story, 2016 Featuring Alec Baldwin and Julianne Moore Interviewee: José Maria João 7-Channel Installation: 7 Hard Drives Commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria (Melbourne), Outset Germany (Berlin) and the Medienboard Berlin-Brandenburg.

Estudio Campana (Brazil), Yarrenyty Arltere Artists (Australia) and Elliat Rich (France) – an important collaboration that draws upon the shared cultural motifs of the artists to create a brightly coloured upholstered dome, to be used as a meeting point and welcoming entrance to the exhibition

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Estudio Campana / Yarrenyty Arltere Artists / Elliat Rich Vitória Régia 2017 (concept) Commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Courtesy Estudio Campana

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Estudio Campana / Yarrenyty Arltere Artists / Elliat Rich Vitória Régia 2017 (concept) Commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Courtesy Estudio Campana

Formafantasma (Italy) – a new body of research by the Italian designers that investigates the impact of the global trade in rare earth materials for consumer goods such as smartphones

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Formafantasma Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani

Guo Pei (China) – an installation of elaborate, Marie Antoinette-inspired gowns from Pei’s latest haute couture collection Legend, following the designer’s work being catapulted onto the international stage when Rihanna wore her canary-yellow ball gown and cape to the 2015 Met Ball

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Guo Pei Rose Studio Autumn/Winter 2011 Haute Couture Courtesy Guo Pei, Rose Studio, Beijing

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Guo Pei Rose Studio Autumn/Winter 2011 Haute Couture Courtesy Guo Pei, Rose Studio, Beijing

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Guo Pei Rose Studio Autumn/Winter 2011 Haute Couture Courtesy Guo Pei, Rose Studio, Beijing

PET Lamp (Spain) and Bula’bula Artists (Australia) – a cross-cultural collaboration between Spanish-based designers PET Lamp and Indigenous women weavers from the Northern Territory to produce the first Australian version of a PET Lamp, a project that emerged in response to the global issue of plastic waste

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PET Lamp / Bula’bula Artists ARTS013856 PET Lamp / Bula’bula Artists EXHI044864 PET Lamp / Bula’bula Artists EXHI044865 Sissel Tolaas Sissel Tolaas Fear 2014 Courtesy the artist and Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark EXHI045365 Formafantasma PET Lamp Ramingining 2017 (process) Commissioned by the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne © Alvaro Catalán de Ocón Photo: Tobias Titz

Richard Mosse (Ireland) – a three-channel video that uses a high-tech long-range military camera to capture events surrounding the crisis in Syria and subsequent flood of refugees, jointly commissioned by the NGV and London’s Barbican Art Gallery

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Richard Mosse Still frame from Incoming 2014-2017 Three-screen HD video installation with 7.1 surround sound 52 mins 10 secs Made in collaboration with Trevor Tweeten & Ben Frost & co-commissioned by National Gallery Victoria & Barbican Art Gallery

Ron Mueck (Australia) – an epic sculptural display from the Melbourne-born, UK-based artist that will intervene with works in the NGV’s 18th century gallery spaces, in Mueck’s largest and most extraordinary work to date

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A sculpture entitled “Mask II” by sculptor Ron Mueck, at the San Ildefonso Museum in Mexico City, on September 20, 2011

Sissel Tolaas (Norway) – the renowned ‘smell designer’, with a personal library of 7,000 smells and 2,500 molecules, will create a ‘scent of Melbourne’ for the NGV Triennial

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Sissel Tolaas Fear 2014 Courtesy the artist and Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark

teamLab (Japan) – an interactive and immersive installation from the famous ‘ultratechnologist’ design collective that digitally recreates a ‘vortex’ that responds as water would to the audience’s presence and movement

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Walk Through the Crystal Universe by teamLab

Xu Zhen (China) – a dramatic and immense sculptural installation that features replicas of famous classical sculptures adorning a 15.8m long sculpture of Buddha, considering the role of tradition and ritual in our increasingly global world

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Xu Zhen. European Thousand-Arms Classical Sculpture, 2014, glass fiber reinforced concrete, marble grains, marble, metal, 304 x 1470 x 473 cm, Produced by MadeIn Company, at Long Museum, Shanghai, China, 2015 Photo: Thomas Fuesser

Yayoi Kusama (Japan) – one of the most respected senior artists working today, Kusama will present a major new participatory project in which visitors will ‘obliterate’ a specially made domestic setting with flower motifs, referencing her first experience of hallucination

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Yayoi Kusama Copyright of Yayoi Kusama and Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/ Singapore

NGV Triennial – Artists and designers:
Adel Abidin, Iraq

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Adel Abidin Cover up! 2014 black and white, one channel video, sound, ed. 1/5 plus artist’s proof, no. 1/5 2 min 25 sec (looped) © Adel Abidin courtesy of Lawrie Shabibi Gallery, Dubai

Alexandra Kehayoglou, Argentina
Analia Saban, Argentina
Ben Quilty, Australia
Brodie Neill, Australia
Büro North, Australia
Camille Henrot, France
Candice Breitz, South Africa
David Altmejd, Canada
Edson Chagas, Angola

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Edson Chagas Emmanuel C. Bofala, Tipo Passe series 2014 type C photograph, artist proof number 1 100.0 x 80.0 cm © Edson Chagas, courtesy Stevenson Gallery Johannesburg

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Edson Chagas Nadir T. Watemb, Tipo Passe series 2014 type C photograph, edition 4/5 100.0 x 80.0 cm © Edson Chagas, courtesy Stevenson Gallery Johannesburg

Einat Amir, Israel

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Einat Amir Coming Soon Near You 2011 Performance, Dallas Contemporary Art Center

Ephrem Solomon, Ethiopia
Estudio Campana / Yarrenyty Arltere Artists/ Elliat Rich, Brazil, Australia, France
Faig Ahmed, Azerbaijan
Formafantasma, Italy
Guo Pei, China
Hassan Hajjaj, Morocco
Iris van Herpen, The Netherlands

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Iris van Herpen, Paris (fashion house) Iris van Herpen (designer) Dress 2011 acrylic, nylon (tulle), metal 78.0 cm (centre back) 35.0 cm (waist, flat) National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Purchased with funds donated by Norma and Stuart Leslie, 2016 2016.594

Jonathan Owen, United Kingdom
Jorge Méndez Blake, Mexico
Joris Laarman, The Netherlands
Josephine Meckseper, Germany
Kay Hassan, South Africa
Kushana Bush, New Zealand
Louisa Bufardeci, Australia
Myoung Ho Lee, South Korea
Nathaniel Mellors, United Kingdom
Nendo, Japan

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Oki Sato, Chief Designer, Nendo

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Nendo Manga chairs (detail) 2015 Courtesy Nendo and Friedman Benda, New York Photo: Kenichi Sonehara EXHI044834 Nendo Manga chairs (detail) 2015 Courtesy Nendo and Friedman Benda, New York Photo: Kenichi Sonehara

Neri Oxman, Israel

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Neri Oxman Vespers 2016 Series 2 Mask 3 Designed by Neri Oxman and members of the Mediated Matter Group for The New Ancient Collection curated and 3D printed by Stratasys, 2016. Photo: Yoram Reshef.

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Neri Oxman Vespers 2016 Series 2 Mask 5 Designed by Neri Oxman and members of the Mediated Matter Group for The New Ancient Collection curated and 3D printed by Stratasys, 2016. Photo: Yoram Reshef. Courtesy of the Mediated Matter Group.

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Neri Oxman Vespers 2016 Series 2 Mask 1 Designed by Neri Oxman and members of the Mediated Matter Group for The New Ancient Collection curated and 3D printed by Stratasys, 2016. Photo: Yoram Reshef. Courtesy of the Mediated Matter Group.

Nick Cave, United States of America
Olaf Breuning, Switzerland
Olga Chernysheva, Russia
Pae White, United States of America
Pascale Marthine Tayou, Cameroon
Paulina Ołowska, Poland
PET Lamp/ Bula’bula Artists, Spain/Australia
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Mexico
Reko Rennie, Australia
Richard Giblett, Hong Kong
Richard Mosse, Ireland
Riley Payne, Australia
Ron Mueck, Australia
Sascha Braunig, Canada
Sean O’Connell, Australia
Shilpa Gupta, India

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Shilpa Gupta Untitled 2013 Thousands of microphones with multichannel audio 165 x 158 x 170 in| 430 x 350 x 400 cm Courtesy the artist & Galleria Continua / Le Moulin, San Gimignano / Beijing / Les Moulins / Habana

Sissel Tolaas, Norway
Tala Madani, Iran
teamLab, Japan
Timo Nasseri, Germany/Iran
Tom Crago, Australia

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Tom Crago and Tantalus Materials 2016–17 Mark Rodda The Sailing Ship 2014 (detail) Courtesy Tantalus, Melbourne Image courtesy the artist and Tantalus, Melbourne

Uji (Hahan) Handoko Eko Saputro, Indonesia
We Make Carpets, The Netherlands
Xu Zhen, China
Yamagami Yukihiro, Japan
Yayoi Kusama, Japan
Zanele Muholi, South Africa

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Zanele Muholi Ntozakhe II, Parktown 2016 Courtesy the artist and STEVENSON gallery, Johannesburg

Event | Bulgari

NGV International | 30 Sept 2016 – 29 Jan 2017 | Free entry

The V.I.P.s (1963)Directed by Anthony Asquith Shown: Elizabeth Taylor

The V.I.P.s (1963) Directed by Anthony Asquith Shown: Elizabeth Taylor

A spectacular display of jewels from the Bulgari Heritage Collection, including emerald and diamond jewellery from the personal collection of Elizabeth Taylor and a ruby and diamond necklace worn by Sophia Loren, will be showcased in Italian Jewels: Bulgari Style.

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Necklace in gold with rubies and diamonds, 1994. Designed as row of cushion-shaped rubies within a frame of baguette and brilliant-cut diamonds in pavé settings supporting a second row of cushion-shaped rubies framed by diamonds and embellished by calibrated cut rubies. The necklace is set with 48 cushion-shaped rubies for a total weight of 59.33 carats. The necklace and the earrings were worn by Sophia Loren in the film Prêt-à-Porter (1994) by Robert Altman

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Earrings in gold with rubies and diamonds, 1994. Each of double Creole design, decorated with cushion-shaped and calibrated cut rubies, in a surround of baguette and brilliant-cut diamonds.

Drawn from Bulgari’s remarkable archives, the pieces highlight the Italian design house’s longstanding relationships with stars of Hollywood and Italian cinema, with a focus on the Dolce Vita period of the 50s and 60s when Rome was a popular location for Hollywood films.

The exhibition will feature more than 80 stunning pieces of jewellery alongside film and photography. Tony Ellwood, Director, NGV said: ‘Italian Jewels: Bulgari Style illustrates the bold design aesthetic of Bulgari through a selection of exquisite gems worn by iconic stars such as Elizabeth Taylor and Ingrid Bergman. The exhibition thematically explores design motifs for which the firm is best known – the serpent, ancient coins and striking color combinations, among others.’

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“Snake” bracelet-watch in yellow gold with emeralds and diamonds, ca 1965. The coiled body designed as alternate rows of scales decorated respectively with brilliant-cut diamonds and guilloché green enamel, the hinged head, opens to reveal the circular white argentè dial and is set with a cushion-shaped emerald and pear-shaped diamond eyes. Circular gold case; back case with crown winder and applied white gold dart-shaped indexes; logo Jaeger LeCoultre printed in black; white gold sword-shaped hands. On the reverse of the head “BVLGARI” engraved; back case numbered “813070”, near the reverse of the neck “SM 6,62 CTS” engraved for the carat weight of the emerald. Total weight 286,60 grams.

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Necklace in two-color gold with diamonds and Florentine Renaissance bronze coin, ca 1978. Designed as a chain of filed curb linking, at the centre a shield-shaped motif decorated with a fleur de lys pavé-set with brilliant-cut diamonds and a Testoon of Alexander de Medici. Marks: on the reverse of the clasp: “BVLGARI / ? ITALY”; on the security catch numbered: “570”; on the tonguepiece “750”; hexagonal frame with addorsed “BB” monogram; the reverse of the coin bezel: ” – ALEXANDER OF MEDICI FLORENCE 1521. 1537. TESTOON – MOULD BY BENVENUTO CELLINI – ” engraved.

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“Bib” necklace in gold with emeralds, amethysts, turquoises and diamonds, 1965. The necklace, in the form of an articulated bib, is decorated with teardrop motifs set with 84 turquoises: ca. 38 carats (total), 37 cabochon emeralds for a total of ca. 72 carats , 27 amethysts: ca. 77 carats (total) and 937 brilliant-cut diamonds: ca. 57 carats (total), mounted in 18 kt gold; the matching pendent earclips are of cascade design, all items mounted in 18 kt gold. Formerly in the collection of Lyn Revson. This necklace is the object of a special edition of 3,500,000 stamps – the “Made in Italy” series – issued by the Poste Italiane to celebrate the Bulgari’s 125th anniversary. Marks: on the reverse of the clasp: “BVLGARI” engraved; on the tongue-piece: hexagonal frame with addorsed “BB” monogram; lozenge with “750”; on the side of the mount: two “eagle’s head”.

Lucia Boscaini, Bulgari Brand and Heritage Curator, remarked: ‘Spanning from the 1930s until today, the works illustrate a strong design heritage and aesthetic evolution, deeply entrenched in Italian history and artisanal traditions. Italian Jewels: Bulgari Style showcases the glamour of a Golden Age of cinema and design, and represents Bulgari’s constant experimentation and inimitable aesthetic codes.’

Highlights include jewels presented to Taylor by her paramour and fifth husband Richard Burton, including an emerald ring he gifted when their love affair first began in Rome on the set of Cleopatra (1963). Bulgari creations favoured by leading women such as Grace Kelly, Anita Ekberg and Gina Lollobrigida will also be showcased, as well as stunning jewels worn on the red carpet by Hollywood stars including Keira Knightley.

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Necklace in platinum with emeralds and diamonds, 1962. Magnificent necklace in platinum and emeralds of 1962. It is mounted with 16 step-cut octagonal Colombian emeralds for an estimated total of 60.50 carats, each in a surround of brilliant-cut and pear-shaped diamonds. Taylor received it as a wedding gift from her husband Richard Burton in 1964. The pendent element with the step-cut Colombian emerald of 23.44 carats, created by Bulgari in 1958 as a brooch, was given to Elizabeth Taylor by Burton for their engagement in 1962 and worn by the actress in their wedding day in 1964. The actress was then immortalized in the necklace in 1966, when she received the Oscar as best actress. Marks: on the reverse of the clasp: “BVLGARI” engraved.

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Ring in platinum with emerald and diamonds, 1961. Ring in platinum with a step-cut octagonal emerald of ca. 7.40 carats; the 12 pear-shaped diamonds have a total weight of ca. 5.30 carats. Created by Bulgari in 1962, it was the first jewel that Elizabeth Taylor received from Richard Burton in Rome during the filming of Cleopatra, when their “scandalous” love story started. From then on, the stellar couple visited the Bulgari store very frequently, because Richard Burton used any and every occasion to give her a jewel. Once the actress told that she felt she was the custodian of her jewels, watching over them and loving them. Jewels were a source of pure happiness for her and she adored wearing them, because she could then share with others their magic powers of joy and excitement. The actress sold it in 2002 at a charity auction for “The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation” and in a letter addressed to the new owners, Taylor wrote “Wear it with love!”. Marks: inside the shank: numbered 358-50.

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“Tremblant” brooch in platinum with emeralds and diamonds, 1960. The brooch was probably given to Elizabeth Taylor by Eddie Fischer, her husband at the time and was worn both as a brooch and hair ornament. On the “tremblant”pieces, flowerheads are mounted on spring settings which allow them to flicker at every movement, thus marvelously radiating their light. Since the 18°  century, realistic floral motifs had been a constant theme in French jewellery. In the early 1960s, Bulgari rivalled the finest Parisian jewellers in creating these asymmetrical sprays. Marks: on the clip mechanism: mark (illegible legible); “DEPOSÉ”.

Other highlights include delicate tremblant brooches, so called because of small springs in the jewellery designs which create a quivering effect, such as a floral hair piece worn by Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman when she starred in The Visit (1964). Sautoirs from the 1970s and pieces featuring cabochon cut gems in chromatic combinations will also convey Bulgari’s unique style.

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“Tremblant” brooch in platinum with diamonds, 1958. The brooch is set with baguette, brilliant- and navette cut diamonds, the flower-head clusters are ‘en tremblant’, mounted 18 kt white gold and platinum. The brooch is mounted with 216 diamonds of various shapes and cuts for a total estimated weight of 46.5 carats Marks: on the rim of the mount (stem): “BVLGARI” engraved; two rectangular marks with “philosopher head”; on the pin: “OR”; oval with “owl”.

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“Tremblant” brooch in platinum with fancy yellow diamonds and diamonds, 1960. The brooch is set with 267 colourless diamonds and variously shaped coloured diamonds ranging from golden yellow to cognac hues, mounted in platinum.Marks: on the clip mechanism: “BVLGARI” engraved; on the prongs: “OR / 750 / P”.

The story of Bulgari stretches back more than a century, when Greek silversmith Sotirio Bulgari came to Rome to seek his fortune, opening his first shop in 1884. From humble beginnings, Bulgari rose to become an emblem of Italian excellence and creativity, favoured by royalty, actresses and high society alike. Drawing inspiration from its Greek and Roman heritage, Bulgari has forged a distinct style that combines tradition and innovation.

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“Playing Card” sautoir in gold with coral, mother-of-pearl, onyx and diamonds, 1972. Designed as a chain of oval links, each inset at the centre with a spade motif respectively in red coral, mother-of-pearl and onyx, the front suspending an oval coral pendant depicting a the king in the guise of French playing cards with an onyx spade motif as crown. Marks: Chain: on the reverse of the mount (penultimate link): “BULGARI” engraved; on the clasp and on the rim of the mount: four ovals with “owl”; on the rim of the mount (penultimate link): lozenge with “square / P / & / Fils”; polygon with “square / P & Fils / 18K”. Pendant: on the rim of the mount: oval with “owl”; on the reverse of the mount, at the centre: polygon with ” square / P & Fils / 18K. Bracelet: on the reverse of the mount (penultimate link): “BULGARI” engraved; on the clasp: oval with “owl”; lozenge with “square / P / & / Fils”; polygon (partially legible) with ” ? / s / K”; on the rim of the mount (end link): lozenge with “square / P / & / Fils”; polygon with “square / P & Fils / 18K”.

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Bracelet in gold with sapphires and diamonds, 1960. Designed as an articulated band composed of oval cabochon and facetted sapphires of light and dark hues, highlighted by brilliant-cut diamonds. Marks: Bracelet: on the reverse of the clasp: “BVLGARI” engraved.

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Bracelets in platinum with diamonds, respectively 1955 and 1959. Designed as a succession of nine bombé oval shaped motifs, each with a brilliant-cut diamond at the centre within a surround of pave-set stones, and connect by arch-shaped links set with baguette diamonds. Formerly in the collection of Ellen Barkin Marks: on the reverse of an oval element, on an applied plaque: “BVLGARI” stamped; hexagonal frame with addorsed “BB” monogram; “Pt 950″; polygon with ” Pt 950″; on the tonguepiece: “eagle’s head”; four “dog’s head”; “OR”; “R / star / S”; on the reverse of the clasp: numbered “1”.

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Necklace in gold and platinum with rubies, emeralds, sapphires and diamonds, ca 1959. The front formed of a succession of diamond-set V-shaped motifs supporting a fringe of cabochon emeralds, rubies and sapphires and brilliant-cut diamonds, the back is designed as line of further cabochon emeralds, rubies and sapphires. Unmarked.

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“Melone” evening bag in gold with sapphire, 1972. The polished and fluted oval case with cabochon sapphire thumbpiece, opening to reveal a fitted mirror, suspended on a golden colour silk cord terminating with a tassel. The interior is fitted with an oval mirror. With a golden coloured silk cord and tassel. Marks: on the rim (interior): “BVLGARI” stamped; lozenge with “750”.

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Necklace in gold with emerald, amethysts, rubies and diamonds, 1989. Designed as a tapering articulated band decorated with foliate motifs set with cabochon amethysts highlighted by channel-set calibré cut rubies and baguette diamonds, the centre collet-set with an oval cabochon emerald. The cabochon Colombian emerald weighs 41.14 carats. Marks: on the reverse of the security catch: “BVLGARI” engraved; on the tongue-piece: hexagonal frame with addorsed “BB” monogram; heptagon with “head of Saint Bernard dog”; on the reverse of the bezel, at the centre: “BVLGARI” engraved; “41.14 cts” engraved for the carat weight of the emerald.

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“Melone” evening bag in gold and burnished steel with diamonds, ca 1972. The polished gold case inset with burnished steel forming a geometrical pattern, the thumbpiece set with circular-cut diamonds, opening to real suspended on a black silk cord terminating with a tassel. Formerly in the collection of Lyn Revson With a blue silk cord and tassel. Marks: on the hinged polygonal suspension loop: “BVLGARI” stamped; on the rim (interior): numbered “637”; lozenge with “750 “; shaped mark with CIF”.

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Sautoir in gold with yellow and blue sapphires, agate, citrines and diamonds, ca 1972. The sautoir is designed as a gold chain of filed curb linking decorated at intervals with oval elements alternatively set with cabochon sapphires and citrines, the front supports a circular pendant set at the centre with a cushion-shaped yellow sapphire within a border of brilliant-cut diamonds, shaped banded blue agate, four cabochon sapphires and brilliant-cut diamonds, the pendant may be detached and worn separately as a brooch. Pendant engraved: BVLGARI 750 (in a lozenge). Chain stamped on the clasp: BVLGARI 750. NB clip fitting on the clasp.

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Necklace in gold with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967. The front decorated with 10 large floral clusters set with 25 cabochon sapphires for a total of ca. 67 carats; 71 cabochon emeralds ca. 48 carats (total); 88 cabochon rubies ca. 75 carats (total); 348 brilliant-cut diamonds ca. 22.5 carats (total). The back formed of similarly set foliate motifs. Marks: on the tongue-piece: “BVLGARI” engraved; inside the clasp: “750”; “eagle’s head”; “SC”; lozenge with “R / star / D /”.

Italian Jewels: Bulgari Style will be on display at NGV International from 30 September 2016 – 29 January 2017. Open daily, 10am-5pm. Entry is free.

Organised by the National Gallery of Victoria in collaboration with Bulgari Heritage.

DESIGN | NGV CarWash

A playful reinvention of the suburban car wash has been announced as the winner of the 2016 NGV Architecture Commission with Melbourne based M@ STUDIO Architects’ winning entry “Haven’t you always wanted to run through all that foam at the car lovers?”

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M@ STUDIO Car Wash 2016 NGV Architecture Commission

With dimensions taken directly from an existing car wash in Blackburn, Melbourne, the design transplants an object of everyday use and familiarity into the unfamiliar surroundings of an art gallery. In place of cement and fluorescent lighting, the structure will have a lightweight steel body with walls made of layered cricket netting and a translucent polycarbonate roof.

The evocative structure will include five ‘bays’ with lanes of bright pink astro turf complete with rubberised humps and road markings. Topped by a glittering ‘car wash’ sign and illuminated at night, the spaces will be used for events, talks, live music performances and more over spring and summer as well as providing a place for Melburnians to gather, play and daydream. The whimsical structure will also include two bays replete with hanging curtains of red plastic, while another will diffuse mist recreating the experience of being at the car wash.

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M@ STUDIO Car Wash 2016 NGV Architecture Commission

M@ STUDIO Architects commented, ‘We are thrilled to be selected as the winner of the 2016 NGV Architecture Commission. Open competitions such as this provide a vital platform for architects to experiment and facilitate public discourse around the broader ideas that motivate the specific design explorations.’

The NGV Architecture Commission is an annual open competition which asks architects to consider innovative ways to activate one of Melbourne’s great civic spaces, the Grollo Equiset Garden, with a thought-provoking work of temporary architecture. Competitors are encouraged to offer a unique response to the site, explore new propositions about architecture and design, and demonstrate innovation in material use, fabrication, sustainability and recyclability.

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M@ STUDIO Car Wash 2016 NGV Architecture Commission

The 2016 competition was judged by Corbett Lyon (Lyons Architecture), Rachel Neeson (Neeson Murcutt Architects), Emma Williamson (CODA) and Fleur Watson (RMIT Design Hub), with Andrew Mackenzie of City Lab acting as competition advisor. The competition consisted of an anonymous Stage One where five projects were shortlisted from an entry pool of 93. In Stage Two the shortlisted entrants presented a resolved design to be assessed on quality, originality and viability.

Led by the Department of Contemporary Design and Architecture, the inaugural Architecture Commission was presented in 2015 by John Wardle Architects, who designed an exuberant pavilion of steel, timber and hand-formed textile elements. Taking inspiration from the Sidney Myer Music Bowl, the pavilion lifts dramatically on high arches to form an open-sided, shaded space. The 2016 NGV Architecture Commission will be on display at NGV International from October 2016.

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M@ STUDIO Car Wash 2016 NGV Architecture Commission

The Pink Pavilion

A soaring nine metre-high pink pavilion, inspired by the Sidney Myer Music Bowl and adorned with 1350 hand-folded fuchsia-coloured blooms, has been revealed by John Wardle Architects  at NGV International.

Designed in Collingwood, assembled in Laverton North and built in Melbourne, the ephemeral structure is entirely Melbourne-made and, over spring and summer, will play host to live music performances, panel talks, kids’ activities, picnics and more.

The pavilion will flood visitors in glittering, kaleidoscopic pink light as they stand under an 18 metre-wide translucent canopy of origami-like folded polypropylene, regarded as the world’s most sustainable and recyclable material and more commonly used to produce Australia’s polymer banknotes.

The Summer Architecture Commission is a new annual project at the NGV which invites designers and architects to produce an ephemeral structure or installation for NGV International’s Grollo Equiset Garden.

The 2015 Summer Architecture Commission: John Wardle Architects is on public display from 24 September 2015 – 1 May 2016.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

23 SEP 15 14°C MELBOURNE - 23 23 SEP 15 14°C MELBOURNE - 25 23 SEP 15 14°C MELBOURNE - 28 23 SEP 15 14°C MELBOURNE - 31 23 SEP 15 14°C MELBOURNE - 32

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

The Pink Pavilion by John Wardle Architects. © oh.yes.melbourne.

Hermitage Masterpieces

CHINESE Crab-shaped box on a leaf tray (1740s –50s) silver, enamel, silver-gilt (a) 4.0 x 14.0 x 13.0 cm (box) (b) 3.0 x 22.0 x 17.0 cm (stand) The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg (Inv. no. ЛС-9 а,б, ВВс-186)

CHINESE
Crab-shaped box on a leaf tray (1740s –50s)
silver, enamel, silver-gilt
(a) 4.0 x 14.0 x 13.0 cm (box)
(b) 3.0 x 22.0 x 17.0 cm (stand)
The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg (Inv. no. ЛС-9 а,б, ВВс-186)

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